12/13/2018

Global Freedom of Expression | The Case of Hamad Al-Naqi (Kuwait Twitter Blasphemy Case) - Global Freedom of Expression

Content Attribution Policy
Global Freedom of Expression is an academic ini a ve and therefore, we encourage you to share and republish excerpts of our
content so long as they are not used for commercial purposes and you respect the following policy:
•

A ribute Columbia Global Freedom of Expression as the source.

•

Link to the original URL of the specific case analysis, publica on, update, blog or landing page of the down loadable content
you are referencing.

A ribu on, copyright, and license informa on for media used by Global Freedom of Expression is available on our Credits
(h ps://globalfreedomofexpression.columbia.edu/credits/) page.

CAS E   A NA LYS I S
Case Summary and Outcome
Hamad Al‑Naqi, a Kuwai  Shia blogger, was sentence by a Kuwai  court to ten years imprisonment for viola ng Ar cle 15 of the Na onal Security
Law and Ar cle 111 of the Penal Code.  These charges stem from comments that he posted on Tweeter that cri cized the rulers of Saudi Arabia and
Bahrain and insulted the Prophet Muhammed and his followers. His case was appealed on July 20, 2014, however, the lower court’s decision and
sentence was affirmed.
Columbia Global Freedom of Expression could not iden fy the official legal and government records on the case and that the informa on contained
in this report was derived from secondary sources. It must be noted that media outlets may not provide complete informa on about this case.
Addi onal informa on regarding this legal ma er will be updated as an official source becomes available.

Facts
In March 2012, Hamad Al‑Naqi posted  comments to Twi er that were cri cal of the rulers of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain as well as the Prophet
Muhammed and his followers. He was sentenced to ten years in prison on June 5, 2012. While in prison Al‑Naqi has faced physical violence from
other inmates. In response to this, authori es have placed Al‑Naqi into solitary confinement. [1]
[1] Kuwait: 10 Years for Cri cizing Neighboring Rulers, (June 7, 2012), h p://www.hrw.org/news/2012/06/07/kuwait‑10‑years‑cri cizing‑
neighboring‑rulers.

Decision Overview
On June 5, 2012, Kuwait’s Court of First Instance held that Al‑Naqi was guilty of “insul ng the Prophet, the Prophet’s wife and companions, mocking
Islam, provoking sectarian tensions, insul ng the rulers of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain and misusing his mobile phone to spread the comments.” [1]
The Court held  that Al‑Naqi had violated both Ar cle 15 of the Na onal Security Law as well as Ar cle 111 of the Kuwai  Penal Code.
Ar cle 15 of the Na onal Security Law prescribes a minimum three year sentence for “inten onally broadcas ng news, statements, or false or
malicious rumors…that harm the na onal interest of the state.” [2] Addi onally, Ar cle 111 of the Penal Code states that a fine shall be imposed on
anyone who “distributes, by any one of the public means specified in [A]r cle 101, opinions that include sarcasm, contempt, or beli ling of a
religion or a religious school of thought, whether by defama on of its belief system or its tradi ons or its rituals or its instruc ons.” [3]

https://globalfreedomofexpression.columbia.edu/cases/the-case-of-hamad-al-naqi-kuwait-twitter-blasphemy-case/

2/4

Select target paragraph3